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How to Put Up a Snow Fence

Learn how to put up a snow fence before the snow really starts to fly.

If you live in the Midwest, you know that snow starts early and keeps falling well into the season. While some might find the white, fluffy stuff fun, it can be a real pain when it starts to drift, especially on your driveway. If you have a long driveway or just want to keep the snow from drifting into the road, a snow fence is a great option.

How to Put Up a Snow Fence
A snow fence can help you keep your driveway or road from drifting over. Learn how to put up one with Blain’s Farm & Fleet.

What does a snow fence do?

A snow fence is meant to direct and create snow drifts behind the fence. It’s essentially a windbreak. It doesn’t stop snow, but it can help keep it from drifting into your driveway or the road. If you live in a rural area, you know the plows don’t always get to the road before it gets drifted over. If your snow fence is properly installed, it should cause the drift to pile up on the downwind side of the fence.

Before you put up your snow fence, you need to know where it goes. It should go upwind of the spot you want to keep clear. For the fence to work, the general rule is that the fence should be installed 35 times the height of the fence away from the road or driveway. So if you have a 4′ fence, it will need to be 140′ from the roadway.

How to Put Up a Snow Fence

1. For a 4′ snow fence, posts should be no more than 8′ apart. The fence is acting as a barrier and needs to be able to handle the snow drift. End posts should be 6′ or less from adjacent posts.

2. Use T-posts for the fence, not metal U-posts. Drive each 6′ T-post approximately 1/3 of their height deep in the ground.

3. Line up your snow fence on the posts, leaving a gap of at least 5″ between the bottom of the fence and the ground.

4. Tighten the fence and secure it to the posts with cable ties. Tie support wires to the end posts to stabilize the fence and prevent possible sagging.

A temporary snow fence is an easy and affordable way to control snow drifts around your home and farm. For more how-to’s and DIY projects, visit the Blain’s Farm & Fleet blog.

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