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7 Myths About Chicken Eggs

Get the truth on seven myths about chicken eggs from Nutrena and Blain’s Farm & Fleet.

If you’re new to raising chickens, you may have some questions about your chickens and their eggs. There’s plenty of information – both true and false – out there about eggs. Nutrena and Blain’s Farm & Fleet are here to help debunk seven myths about eggs, so you have a better understanding about your backyard birds.

1. Roosters = Eggs

7 Myths About Chicken Eggs
Nutrena and Blain’s Farm & Fleet are here to help debunk seven myths about eggs, so you have a better understanding about your backyard birds.

You do not need a rooster around for hens to lay eggs. However, if you want to have chicks, you’ll need a rooster to make the eggs fertile.

2. Brown’s Better Than White

Again, nope. Brown eggs have the same nutritional content as white ones. Often, a chicken’s earlobe color will tell the color of her eggs – red earlobes typically mean brown eggs, white earlobes mean white.

3. Darker Yolks Are Healthier

Yolk color does not affect nutritional value. Vibrant color comes from eating outdoor plants or feeds that contain marigold extract (carotenoids). Home-produced eggs tend to have bright yellow to deep orange yolks. Store-bought egg yolks are often paler in color.

4. Fertilized Eggs Are Better For You

Fertilization does not affect an egg’s nutritional value. It’s that simple.

5. Bigger Hens Mean Bigger Eggs

Actually, it’s more about the quantity of feed your hens are getting. Low body weight most likely equates to a drop in egg size. Average hens should consume about 1.5 lb of food per week. Learn about feeding your birds with our chicken feed guide.

6. Always Wash Your Eggs

Fresh eggs have a very thin coating called “bloom,” on them that prevents germs/bacteria from getting through the shell. Commercial egg producers have to wash that off – you don’t. Just wipe eggs with a dry cloth to knock off dirt. If you get a “messy” egg, wash it – then put it in the fridge and try to use it before any unwashed eggs.

7. Blood Spots Are Bad

Blood spots simply indicate a rupture in some of the tiny blood vessels in the egg. This can be seen in older or very young hens. While not pretty, it’s not harmful at all and the eggs are still edible.

This was originally posted by Tiffany T. on scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com.

Raising backyard chickens can rewarding for the whole family. To learn more about the care and keeping of your flock, visit our Hobby Farming blog.

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