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How to Train Your Dog to Your New Containment System

Learn how to train your dog to your new dog fence with PetSafe and Blain’s Farm & Fleet.

Proper training of your pet is essential for successful use of your PetSafe fence. Training should be fair, firm, fun and consistent for you and your dog. While PetSafe suggests a minimum of 14 days of training, it could take more or less time depending on how your pet learns. It’s important to not try too much too quickly and to be patient. Follow this training program from PetSafe, presented by Blain’s Farm & Fleet.

How to Train Your Dog to Your New Containment System
Proper training of your pet is essential for successful use of your PetSafe fence. Go through the training process with PetSafe and Blain’s Farm & Fleet.

Introduction to Training

Train for 10 to 15 minutes at a time. Short, frequent sessions are better than longer, less frequent sessions. You want your dog to remain calm. Keep an eye out for stress signals, such as ears tucked, tail down, body lowered, nervous/frantic movement, stiffening of your pet’s body or your pet pulling on the leash toward the house. If your pet shows these signs, slow down the training schedule, add more days of training or increase the amount of play time with your pet in their PetSafe fence area.

Your pet must be completely comfortable near the Boundary Flags at the end of every training session. To make sure he’s comfortable, allow at least 5 minutes of play time at the end of each session within 10 feet of the flags. Before a training session begins, put a non-metallic collar on your pet above the Receiver Collar and attach a leash. Remember to praise your pet with play, treats and toys for positive reinforcement.

Day 1 – Boundary Awareness, Tone Only Training Mode

On the first day the goal is to teach your pet that the Boundary Flags and noise from the Receiver Collar define the new pet area. Program the Static Correction Level on the Receiver Collar to Level 1, which is the tone only training mode. Perform three 10-15 minute sessions on the first day.

  • Start by walking your dog on the leash in the pet area. Move toward the Boundary Flags while praising your pet and keep the mood calm and happy.
  • As your dog enters the Boundary Zone, the collar will begin to beep. Keep your pet in that area for up to 2 seconds, then gently help them back into the designated pet area.
  • Praise and offer your pet a treat as he or she enters the pet area. Repeat these three steps at the same Boundary Flag until your pet stops going into the Boundary Zone. Then move to another flag. Repeat this process with the goal of mastering 3-4 flags per session.

 

Days 2 – 4 – Continue Boundary Awareness, Introduction to Static Correction

This phase of training also requires three 10-15 minute sessions each day. The goal of this phase is to train your pet to stay in the pet area and know his boundaries. The Receiver Collar should be set to Level 2.

  • Repeat the steps from day 1. If your dog doesn’t respond to the Static Correction, make sure the Receiver Collar is properly fitted. If it’s on correctly, and your pet doesn’t respond to the Static Correction, increase it by one level.
  • Watch for slight reactions, such as head turned, looking at the ground and ears up. Stay at the same Boundary Flag until your pet resists going into the Boundary Zone.

 

Days 5 – 8 – Distraction Phase

During this phase of training, perform three 10-15 minute sessions each day. The goal of this phase is to train your pet to stay in the pet area even with distractions outside of the pet area. Only use external distractions – don’t coax or call your pet. Program the Static Correction Level to Level 2 or higher, depending on the reaction results from days 2 – 4.

  • Create external distractions while keeping full control of your pet on a leash. Throw a ball or treat outside the pet area, have a neighbor walk their pet outside the area or have a family cross from the inside to the outside of the pet area.
  • If your pet doesn’t move toward the distraction, reward them with praise and a treat. If your pet does react, let him go to the Boundary Zone. Help your pet back into the pet area if he doesn’t turn back after a few seconds. Give your pet a treat anytime he or she comes back into the pet area – with or without help.
  • Repeat this process with other distractions, increasing the level of distractions as your pet continues to ignore them and return to the pet area.

 

Days 9 – 14 – Unleashed Supervision

This phase should start with 10-15 minutes, eventually increasing to over an hour. Your pet is only ready for unleashed supervision when he clearly avoids the entire Boundary Zone, regardless of temptations or distractions. Do not leave your pet unattended – the goal is to let your pet run free in the pet area without a leash.

  • Enter the pet area with your pet wearing the receiver collar, set at the appropriate Static Correction Level. Walk around the yard and play with your pet, staying within the pet area at all times.
  • Preoccupy yourself with a task or activity in the yard while keeping an eye on your dog.

 

Days 15 – 30 – Pet Monitoring

After the two weeks of training, your pet should be ready to run free! Keep an eye on your furry family member when they’re outside, but you don’t have to be in the pet area with him or her. Once you’re certain that your pet knows the boundaries, begin removing every other Boundary Flag every four days until you’ve removed all the flags. Keep the flags in a safe place in case you need to train another pet or you move.

This tutorial was originally posted by a guest author on PetSafe.net.

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